Easy {yeast} Artisan Bread

It’s the first day of December! I can’t believe Thanksgiving has come and gone already!  Now it’s on to Christmas!  (I personally am very excited about being able to unabashedly listen to Christmas music all the time. :D) Surprisingly, I’m actually pretty close to being done with my Christmas shopping already! (Besides owing a few of my family members…) 😀 And several of my gifts are even wrapped! 😮

So, I haven’t had the best luck with yeast breads. I’ve tried making them a couple times before, and they’ve looked beautiful, but they’ve been far from acceptable to the taste buds. But, I decided to try again, and I found a super easy recipe (thanks Google) and it was DELICIOUS!  So I decided to share it with you guys. I forgot to take any pictures throughout the process of making it, but honestly there’s so little that you do, I probably would’ve only had like two pictures anyway. But I did take a couple pictures after it was done, and I’ll be sure to include them. 🙂

 

First thing you do is (with a spoon) mix 3 cups lukewarm water, 1 ½ Tablespoons  active, dry yeast, 1 ½ Tablespoons kosher salt or 1 tablespoon regular salt, (less, if you want. I used a little less than 1 Tablespoon of regular salt) and 6 ½ cups flour in a large bowl until it’s all well incorporated. (No kneading necessary)

Put a lid on the bowl (I let a small section of the lid stay open just to let the  gases from the yeast escape. In the original recipe you’ll notice she mentions that) and let sit in a warm place for about 2 hours. (The top of the fridge worked for me) 🙂

After the two hours, take the dough out and divide it into 3 or 4 sections. The original recipe says only 3, and that’s what I did but mine got really big, so next time I might try doing 4. With well-floured hands, (the dough gets pretty sticky) form the sections of dough into nice balls. (they don’t have to perfect) Let the dough rest for another 40 minutes on floured parchment paper.

Preheat your oven to 450° F and bake the bread for about 30-35 minutes on a pizza stone or I used a cookie sheet with the parchment paper. After 25 minutes, if you want you can place the bread straight on the oven rack for 5-10 more minutes so the bottom can get crustier. Check to make sure the bread is done by taking it out, flipping it over and tapping on the bottom of the loaf lightly with your knuckles. If it sounds hollow, it should be done.

Let it cool for a few minutes and enjoy, (I personally that’s the best way to eat homemade bread) or you can put it in the freezer for a later date.

bread2

If you only want to make one or two loaves for now, after you separate the dough, (before you let it rest the first time) you can put 1 or 2 of the sections of dough in a plastic container in the fridge, and bake it later. I baked 2 of the sections right away and put 1 of them in the fridge and made it about 2 days later, and I don’t know why, but that loaf came out a lot differently. It didn’t rise as much so it was a lot smaller, it was more dense and it just looked different. (I didn’t take a picture of it, sorry) Anyway, so personally I think it might be best to make all the loaves at once.

bread3

Find the original recipe here



Ingredients

  • 3 cups lukewarm water
  • 1 ½ tablespoons active, dry yeast
  • 1 ½ tablespoons kosher salt or 1 tablespoon regular salt
  • 6 ½ cups all-purpose flour

Directions

Mix all ingredients with a spoon in a large bowl. Put a lid on the bowl and let the dough rest for about 2 hours.

With well-floured hands take the dough and divide it into 3-4 equal sections. Form the sections into neat balls. (they don’t have to be perfect) Put them on floured parchment paper and let rest for another 40 minutes.

Preheat your oven to 450° and bake the bread for about 30-35 minutes on a pizza stone or a cookie sheet with the floured parchment paper. After 25 minutes, place the bread straight on the oven rack for 5-10 more minutes so the bottom can get crustier.(⇐optional) Check to make sure the bread is done by taking it out, flipping it over and tapping on the bottom of the loaf lightly with your knuckles. If it sounds hollow, it should be done.

Enjoy after it has cooled some, or freeze for later!

Source: Frugal Living NW



 

Well, if you have actually read through all of that wordy recipe, congratulations! 😛 And if not, I don’t blame you. I probably wouldn’t have either. 😀

Anyway, I hope everyone has a lovely weekend!

♥  Melanie ♥

 

 

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2 thoughts on “Easy {yeast} Artisan Bread

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